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Arts, Market and the State: Cultural Policies in Introspect

The field of cultural policies is novel and burgeoning; it harbors diverse and even contradictory approaches, with no universally recognizable principles; it has no common language of its own nor any unified theoretical perspective. The field is fragmented and heterogeneous in nature and bound to the interaction of multiple actors in different institutional settings. Although it began initially as a western academic and institutional endeavor, and developed mostly in the U.S. and Western Europe, cultural policies has turned out to be a common good for the entire world both as an academic discipline and as a bureaucratic and institutional enterprise.

Arts Market and the State Cultural Policies in Introspect

Cultural Policy: Management, Value and Modernity
in the Creative Industries

By  Dave O’Brien

London, New York: Routledge, 2014, 166 pages, ISBN: 9780415817608


 

Arts Management and Cultural Policy Research

By Jonathan Paquette and Eleonora Redaelli

London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 162 pages, ISBN: 9781137460912


 

Cultural Policies in East Asia: Dynamics between
the State, Arts and Creative Industries

Edited by Hye-Kyung Lee and Lorraine Lim

London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 229 pages, ISBN: 9781137327765

 

 

The field of cultural policies is novel and burgeoning; it harbors diverse and even contradictory approaches, with no universally recognizable principles; it has no common language of its own nor any unified theoretical perspective. The field is fragmented and heterogeneous in nature and bound to the interaction of multiple actors in different institutional settings. Although it began initially as a western academic and institutional endeavor, and developed mostly in the U.S. and Western Europe, cultural policies has turned out to be a common good for the entire world both as an academic discipline and as a bureaucratic and institutional enterprise.

The relationship between arts, culture, market, and state gets more problematic when the diversity and the desired homogeneity of culture are considered with anthropological sensitivity. The use of culture for nation building and nation branding has been criticized by circles who approach art from an “art for arts’ sake” perspective and bestow a sui-generis privilege to the artistic realm independent of any government or public engagement or intervention. States, however, are keen on making cultural policy as a part of both their hegemonic and economic development agenda.

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