Challenging ideas
On Turkish politics and International affairs

Insight Turkey > Reviews > Book Reviews |

An Introduction to Non-Traditional Security Studies: A Transnational Approach

In An Introduction to Non-Traditional Security Studies: A Transnational Approach, the contributors explore the post-Cold War concept of non-traditional security and argue its importance in order to understand the emerging non-military issues states must face. In the light of various crises which have no explanation from the Realist schools of thought, the authors argue that the issues have to be considered from a different point of view, specifically from a human security perspective.

In An Introduction to Non-Traditional Security Studies: A Transnational Approach, the contributors explore the post-Cold War concept of non-traditional security and argue its importance in order to understand the emerging non-military issues states must face. In the light of various crises which have no explanation from the Realist schools of thought, the authors argue that the issues have to be considered from a different point of view, specifically from a human security perspective. Because the editor and the contributors are mostly experts active within Asia, their views generally differ from western thought, thus echoing the idea that non-state actors need to be included in security studies in order to explain various threats.

The authors split the book into two major parts: they first discuss the concepts that revolve around non-traditional security, the history and the need for non-traditional security studies, and last but not least, the schools of thought on security that have emerged, especially after the end of the Cold War. These schools are mostly related to critical security studies such as feminist and post-colonialist schools of thought, among many others. Also in the first part, the authors present the actors that are considered within the mindset of non-traditional security studies. Keeping this idea in mind, the authors begin the second part of the book by describing the issues related to economic security, environmental security, food security, energy security, water security and health security. The last two chapters deal with migration issues and transnational crime. The authors argue that the identification of actors and the definition of security depend primarily on the threat that is being considered by each individual. In that sense, the authors unify all of the chapters into concepts relevant to human security, such as freedom from fear and freedom from want.

Already have an account? Sign In.
Print Subscription
4 Print Issues
Subscribe
Digital Subscription
4 Digital Issues
Subscribe
Premium Subscription
4 Print Issues
4 Digital Issues
Subscribe

Labels »  

Call for Paper | Politics of the Balkans and Future Perspectives